Tuesday, July 29, 2014

10 Effective Writing Rules

Earlier today I came across a Daily Writing Prompt that said: "Write your top 10 rules for writing fiction." I immediately sat down and did so. Perhaps you've already seen the picture of my rules floating around on Pinterest.

Making this image big would negate the point of this post so HA.

Well I want to expand on those and give detailed descriptions to each so that you can have a grounded basis for why those are my Top 10 Rules. So without further ado...

S. Alex Martin's Top 10 Rules for Writing Fiction

RULE #1. USE THE SIMPLEST WORDS POSSIBLE

When it comes to reading a book, people want it to be two things: easy and clear. Unless you are a scholar studying ancient or classical literature, you'll probably stop reading a book that has huge words that you keep opening a dictionary to figure what they mean.

Let me just lay this out for you: the other day I was browsing Facebook and came across a post on a writing group where the person was trying to sound professional and important...but done in such a ridiculous way that he lost all credibility in one paragraph. The post has since been deleted, but I've been using it for examples of what not to do. I'm copying it exactly how the person wrote it, so here it is:

"I read some stuff you guys wrote here with venerate. I joined this group for a reason, You see I have been vacuous for some time now, my mind is undulate I can't write no more. It's a bit confusing for me has anyone else here been through this feeling?
my thoughts were ubiquitous and now my mind seems numb of ideas. I think my mind transmuted. What i wish to know is as you all are writers and you all know the beautiful feeling to put down emotions on a paper, how wonderful it is."



Be honest. You brain hurts, too. Not only did he use those huge words incorrectly, but they just wouldn't make much sense to begin with even if he had used them correctly. It's a struggle to read that. Writing should be easy. Use simple words with strong meanings. Don't say, "I took the gun from him." Say, "I swiped the gun from him." It conveys so much more meaning and is still easy to read.

A good rule to follow is: when writing fiction novels, keep the writing at a fifth-grade level. It doesn't have to be complicated to be good. Don't fall into the trap. You'll just look silly if you start spouting out words you don't even know the definition of.


RULE #2. DON'T INCLUDE EVENTS OR DETAILS THAT AREN'T IMPORTANT TO CHARACTERIZATION OR PLOT

This is easier said than done. Especially when we write early drafts, we tend to stuff in as much information as possible. It might be our innate instinct toward world building. We want to stuff our readers' heads full of the world in our story. We want them to know EVERYTHING.

Well...sometimes less is more. The people critiquing my novel, Embassy, made good work of pointing out things that just weren't important. For example: is it important to learn that the home city of Arman, my MC, has two libraries? What's more, is it important to find that out more than halfway through the novel, after they've flown away from that planet? No. The fact that Cornell has two libraries doesn't matter one single bit.

Try to include details that characterize or advance the plot. When you meet Glacia Haverns, my FMC, she is described as "...Cornell's ambidextrous Hologis junkie....in fact, she's so well known that six people groan when she walks into the waiting room." That's eight pages into the book, and it's all you need to know about her for a while. You understand she gets a thrill out of Hologis (a futuristic sport in my book) and she has a reputation surrounding it. Those are the details you want to include.

(Since then, Embassy has been edited 13 times)



RULE #3. USE ACTION TO EXPLAIN EVENTS WHERE POSSIBLE

Which would you prefer to read: a paragraph explaining the climatic fight scene, or several pages showing the injuries and punches and bullets flying? The second one, right? Should be.

Action is exciting. Not just fight scenes, but seeing interaction between characters, an argument, a race, a living maze...draw these events out and make them come alive. Show us what happens as it happens. Gets our hearts pounding. Make us smile. Let us hear the angry voices.

Readers want to get as much as possible out of books, so learn what's important to show over a couple pages and what's acceptable to describe in a paragraph.

Just please don't take lessons from Michael Bay.

RULE #4. WRITE AT LEAST 90% OF THE STORY IN THE ACTIVE VOICE

I'll keep this one plain and simple: statistics show that books written somewhere between 90--95% in the active voice sell better than books written with any lower percentage. Passive voice is wordy. Say what you want to say, and be done with it. If you want to see an example of active vs. passive, it's your lucky day because I'm about to give you an example.

Example One
ACTIVE: "She carried the bucket to the barn."
PASSIVE: "The bucket was carried to the barn by her."

Example Two
ACTIVE: "I'm not selling those books."
PASSIVE: "Those books aren't for sale."

What? Wait. Why is the passive voice of the second example wrong? Okay, to be honest, this is one of those that you can be lenient about. It means exactly the same thing as its active voice equivalent--except in one way. Nothing is doing the selling in the passive voice. The books aren't being acted upon. That's what's wrong.



RULE #5. DIALOGUE IS THE STRONGEST FORM OF CHARACTERIZATION

There are so many ways to characterize through dialogue, it's not even funny. Speech patterns, quirks, stutters, slurs, screams, whispers, catch phrases, monosyllabic word choices, evil words, heroic words, funny words, sad words. All of that and more inside a pair of quotation marks. It's literally a perfectly acceptable form of telling.

Of course, don't do too much telling. You still want the speech to sound natural. But that's the beauty of it all. Get to know the ways each character talks, and the characterization possibilities are endless. Harness that power. Use it wisely.



RULE #6. MAKE SURE SOMETHING CHANGES BY THE END OF THE STORY, PREFERABLY THE MAIN CHARACTER

If you send readers on a journey with a character who learns nothing whatsoever...you're going to lose a lot of readers before the end. Something has to change. Whether it be a power struggle, a noble death, coming-of-age...doesn't matter. If readers can compare and contrast the characters as they were in the beginning of the story versus how the characters were in the end, you've done your job right.

Make the changes and transitions natural. Don't rush. People don't usually change overnight. A series of events happens and they learn things from those events. Oh, and make the change logical. Think of Star Wars. Anakin was supposed to become a Jedi, but the way events unfolded made him succumb to the Dark Side.



RULE #7. IF YOU CAN'T AVOID A CLICHE, DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT WITH IT

These days, you see all these books with love triangles. The girl can't choose which guy she wants, blah blah blah. Or the MC is actually some prophecized hero who will one day save the world. Or a guy falls into a vat of radioactive acid and becomes a superhero/villain. And then what happens?

Events unfold EXACTLY as we predict they will, making the story boring.

The love triangle becomes the focus of the book. The hero develops the most powerful abilities any character in the world has ever seen. Another guy happens to develop superpowers at the exact same time as the guy who fell into the acid. Didn’t see THAT one coming, did we?

Get creative, people. If you have to recycle plots, add your own twist. Please. I beg you.



RULE #8. IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE WHETHER YOU LIKE WHAT YOU WROTE -- REWRITE IT

You're going to have days where you write a scene, maybe a few pages...heck, even a full chapter, but it just doesn't feel right. Something doesn't fit, or this stretches too far or completely deviates from the plot.

Imagine it like this: you've been looking forward to seeing a movie, but when you walk out of the theatre, you don't really have anything to say about it. You want to like it because you waited so long, but when you're honest with yourself, it just wasn't that great. THAT is the feeling I'm talking about.

If you aren't sure about what you wrote, go and rewrite it. Maybe change everything, maybe tweak a few things. Let yourself find the flow of the story. I deleted 190 pages of Embassy in the fourth draft because they didn't fit...and sometimes as I made the rewrites, I found things I still didn't like. What did I do? Scrapped them and rewrote those scenes.

I probably rewrote close to 250 pages of Embassy out of the final 300 pages (aka almost everything after page 146) by the time everything was said and done. The plot had changed and things just didn't fit like they did before. But now I like what I have and it works so much better.



RULE #9. FIND OUT WHAT TIME OF DAY YOUR IMAGINATION REACHES ITS PEAK AND MAKE SURE TO ALWAYS WRITE DURING THAT TIME

If you want to be productive as a writer--this is crucial. First off, I encourage you to write every day, and whenever you can every day. But if there's one point of the day that you MUST write, it's when your imagination reaches its peak. This is pretty easy to figure out: what time of day do the words just spill off the tips of your fingers with ease?

My imagination reaches its peak between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. So every day between 11 p.m. and 1 a.m. you'll find me writing. Something. Anything. Homework. Book. Whatever. My mind is a broken dam between those hours. The ideas and words literally flood my head. I don't have to worry about being "uninspired." That's the sure-fire time for me to write. Even if I've gone all day with zero ideas, I can GUARANTEE the minute 11 p.m. rolls around, my imagination will explode.

And there goes your brain.
Sorry.
To be honest, I've reached the point where I can turn my imagination on and off at will, but 11 p.m. is my "primetime" writing hour. Which leads me to the final point....


RULE #10. KEEP A ROUTINE UNTIL YOU FINISH THE DRAFT

Keep a schedule. I repeat: KEEP A SCHEDULE. When you write a book, the best thing to do is set aside time every day to write. Try not to change the time. If two o'clock in the afternoon to three o'clock is the only available time you have, make sure you write in that hour. Maybe on the weekends you can set aside a block of four or five hours to write.


Whatever your plan, STICK TO IT. Discipline is essential. You're going to hate it some days, but who cares? That's life. Finish the draft, whether it be the first, second, or fourth, and then give yourself a well-deserved few weeks (or months, if you'd like) away from that project. Go out for a fancy dinner. Pat yourself on the back. Eat some Ben & Jerry's. Go watch a sunset.


Enjoy this post? Check out these others:


Also be sure to check out my Get it Write Tonight ebooks, Characters and Edit! That! Book!
While you're at it, check out my New Adult Science-fiction novel, Embassy.

Monday, July 28, 2014

How to Create a Magnificent Main Character

Read the previous post: How to Create a Vile Villain

I want to give you a perspective on the protagonist, and what makes a memorable main character for the bad guy to face. I will say that this is probably one of the broadest subjects in all of fiction writing, because the main character can take on so many forms and go on so many journeys, whereas the villain usually has a straightforward goal.

(Please excuse the gender bias...I just don't feel like typing "him/her" or "s/he" all the time)

Tip #1: SEND HIM ON A JOURNEY TO OBTAIN A DESIRED GOAL

This is the same concept as Tip #1 in my post, 6 Tips to Hook Your Reader in the First Chapter. The main character in every work of fiction, whether it be fantasy, science-fiction, horror, mystery, romance, literary...whatever, needs a goal important enough to force him to go out and find some way to obtain his desire.

This could be finding treasure, discovering a country, killing a king, or even defeating an army. There are hundreds of adventures. Choose one you love, and make your main character need it so much that he will go mad if he doesn't reach it. This drives the story, creates tension, and generates interest.

The reader will ask: "How will he defeat the dragon that terrorizes the kingdom?" The only way to find out is to read on.



Tip #2: MAKE HIM ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL TO THE PLOT

Make your MC someone who sticks out of a crowd. Someone readers want to read about and discover the life of. Nobody would have read Harry Potter if Seamus Finnigan was the main character. We would miss the whole point of the story! We wouldn't know what happened between Harry and Quirrell would be a complete secret....actually no, because, naturally, the whole school knows!


Okay, bad example.

But you see what I mean? We wouldn't see the action. There would be no love story with Harry and Cho and Ginny, or Ron and Hermione. We wouldn't see the Polyjuice Potion, or the Chamber of Secrets, or the Triwizard Tournament, or the cave and the fake Horcrux. So much of the story would be missing, and we would only see the parts that Seamus witnessed.

So make the main character someone that compelling, interesting things happen to.



Tip #3. MAKE THE READER CARE ABOUT HIM

Remember this above all else: Emotion is the strongest offensive move you can make when writing a story. Love, anger, sadness, anxiety, butterflies in the stomach, ALL THAT. If you write with emotion, your reader will feel it (hopefully, at least). Let's say they do. That means you did something right. You are giving the reader an experience.

Make the reader care. Create sympathy for him. Or make him do something cool that readers like! Give readers a reason to want to know more about the main character.
  


Tip #4. DEVELOP A BACKSTORY FOR YOUR MAIN CHARACTER

You didn't just pop into this world. Events lined up so that you were born. Your parents met somehow. They had you, raised you, and created experiences for you. Then you ventured out into the world and had your own experiences.

Everything you are today is based off a series of events (sometimes unfortunate) and choices (if you believe in free will, of course). We all have a history, so give your main character a history. Make it compelling. Make it relevant. Show that your character was forced to become who he is today, and there is no one else he could be. I mean, you're creating a whole story, might as well deepen it while you have the chance.

Speaking of unfortunate...

Tip #5. MAKE HIM BELIEVABLE. GIVE HIM FLAWS

Flat characters aren't fun (unless his name is Flat Stanley, of course). Develop him as a real person. Give him real quirks. Reasons he would bug you in real life. What's that pestering thing he does? What beliefs of his challenge your own beliefs? Give him those beliefs. Make him biased. Make him arrogant when it comes to a sport he's good at, or how he might feel "above" someone.

Come on, there's something in all of us that we can admit to. USE IT. Develop it. Make him react based on his beliefs, when one of the other characters might have done something completely different. Make a flawed character, because NOBODY IS PERFECT.



Tip #6. GIVE HIM FRIENDS AND COWORKERS AND A SOCIETY WITH WHICH TO INTERACT

Show readers how your main character perceives the world. Show readers how he talks to people.

Does he have a lot of friends, or a close knit group, or any friends at all? Is he shy and looks away or down while talking, or does he hold a firm stare? Does he stand tall, or slouch whenever he has to be around strangers? Does he help someone in need on the street, or does he walk by without a second glance? Does he appreciate his friends, or does he patronize them? Does he take charge, or does he follow? Does he like large groups, or prefer the quietness at home?

This is all about deepening the MC, because the more readers know, the more interested they become, and the more they can relate.



Tip #7. GIVE HIM A SET OF VALUES...TO BREAK

Your main character needs to live his life a certain way. He doesn't go around wreaking havoc one day, and saving the world the next. People are consistent. People are decent (mostly). A majority of the population doesn't go around acting completely bipolar. We have schedules. We have morals and values and stick with them. We form decisions around them.

So should your main character.

As quickly as you can, show what a normal day for your MC is, so the reader can tell whenever he does something against those morals and values. Because in every journey, things won't always go your MC's way, and he'll have to break some of his rules to continue forward. Interesting…



Tip #8. GIVE YOUR MAIN CHARACTER A UNIQUE TRAIT

This is important. You've created a believable character. We've seen all his flaws and interests, and know what family life is like. But something is still missing. A REASON HE IS THE HERO.

Your main character must possess something that no other character in the entire story does. That can be magic powers, or a special gun, or a special set of skills, or knowledge that only he knows. Something. Anything. GIVE IT TO HIM. Your main character shouldn't share this. And he has it because it is essential to the plot and will help him defeat the villain’s fatal flaw (see How to Create a Vile Villain Tip #7).

The same holds true for the main character. Your protagonist and antagonist will confront each other in some sort of final battle, and this is when both of their unique traits will be most important to the story, whether these be flaws or advantages.

Be creative when expressing it. And remember, keep it logical. Readers hate coincidences (aka deus ex machina).



The main character of any story should fascinate us. We should love him. We should know everything about him and feel like he is a long-lost friend. He should be compelling, at the center of attention, and be flawed.

Flat characters who are perfect in every way are BORING. We read books to be interested and love what we read. Pull this off, and you'll see whole fan pages dedicated to your characters.

Enjoy this post? Check out these others:




Friday, July 25, 2014

How to Create a Vile Villain

They are some of the most hated characters in stories...and some of the most loved.

They are evil.

They are flawed.

They are plotters.

They are the villains.


As you can see, he has all the makings of a villain.

But what makes a good villain? Who is he? Why is he in the world? What point does he serve?

This post is all about the forces that drive stories forward. As I like to say, "If the antagonist isn't important, then the protagonist isn't, either."


Tip #1. CHOOSE THE FORM OF THE BAD GUY THAT WOULD HURT YOUR HERO THE MOST

Antagonists come in all different forms. Some are a single villain, some are a group of people, and some are abstract ideas that originate in the mind, or circumstances and obstacles the hero must endure.

Villains aren't always people. They don't have to be. An antagonist opposes the hero, so maybe the hero must fight fantastical beasts, or survive a set of physical challenges. Maybe the hero is emotionally suffering with guilt, unrequitted love, or a moral dilemma that tears him or her apart from the inside.

Presentation of the conflict is crucial.

It doesn't have to be another person.

Tip #2. MAKE THE READER CARE THAT THE VILLAIN HURTS THEIR FAVORITE CHARACTER

Readers should connect to somebody in the story. Maybe the hero, maybe the hero's best friend, or teacher, or even the villain. Whoever the reader connects to the most, make them suffer.

Take a look at the last book you read. Notice how the villain might hurt the hero, but it has an effect on everyone else, too. The hero isn't the only one who suffers. Make people care that the villain hurt someone. Maybe readers love the villain and are awed by his power and opposition.

Make that count. Drive it home using emotion. Play the heartstrings of the reader, and they'll love your characters forever.



Tip #3. MAKE THE VILLAIN MEMORABLE

He has to stick in our minds. We have to know WHY he hurts the hero, HOW he hurts him, and WHAT he expects to gain from doing so. Maybe the hero is trying to foil a master plan, so the villain needs to get rid of him in order to rule the world. Maybe the hero is trying to be elected into office, so the villain tries to prevent that from happening so a law doesn't get passed.

Anything. Make it interesting, make it exciting, and make it resonate with the overall story. When it comes to books, we remember characters who gave us butterflies, made us feel sick, or made us angry. Or we felt like they were a close friend and could relate.

If a character can achieve a physical response in our bodies, we will never forget them.



Tip #4. GIVE THE VILLAIN A BACKSTORY

Unless you are making a movie for Marvel Comics, you should know that most villains don't just pop up out of the blue. They have existed elsewhere. You can see how they have shaped the world. There are lasting effects that every character stuffs up in the back of his mind.

Voldemort didn't just come out and attack the Ministry of Magic and Hogwarts - he was a major influence in the whole wizarding community for his entire life. From the orphanage, to his years at Hogwarts, to the construction of the Horcruxes and the First War against Dumbledore and the Order of the Phoenix. Voldemort had a presence the entire time, even when he wasn't physically there.

You want most villains to be like that. If nothing else, they should have some relevance to the hero's life and how the hero has shaped himself.



Tip #5. READERS LIKE LOGIC....AND SO SHOULD YOU

I have read one too many stories where a character suddenly becomes the bad guy because his friend accidentally killed another friend, or the girl he loves doesn't like him, so he turns into a supervillain with a vengeance against her boyfriend...who just so happens to be a superhero.

Come on people. Really? No, seriously, really? Was it so devastating that he just had to go off on a murderous streak?

No, and readers know this. They don't want to read some cheesy inciting incident - they want to see the villain develop, or at least understand how he developed. This builds a mutual trust between reader and author, makes characters more believable, and thus makes readers LIKE the story.

If villains like the Green Goblin, Doc Oc, Whiplash (Iron Man 2), and Sandman popped up all the time, NYC would be screwed. At least Loki had a plan. Unfortunately, it included the fatal flaw of many villains these days....



Tip #6. IF YOUR VILLAIN WAGES WAR, PLEASE, PLEASE DON'T LET THEM HAVE A "REMOTE CONTROL" ARMY

What does this mean? Let me tell you. In "The Avengers," the fatal flaw was that the whole army turned out to be robotic and by destroying the mothership, the army shut down and the six people fighting aliens miraculously won. Or like in "Battle: Los Angeles," (a movie I personally loved), the drones were powered by the control beacons and LA was saved when Harvey Dent shot a missile at the retreating mothership.

I'm just saying, while these make for cool action sequences, please try not to include that unless robots are literally taking over the world. We as readers don't like seeing something end so easily (if you've read "Inheritance," by Christopher Paolini, you'll agree that King Galbatorix TOTALLY would have won that fight instead of acting like a little girl. Shruikan didn't even try to help).

What am I trying to say? MAKE YOUR VILLAIN STRONG!!! But not invincible.



Tip #7. GIVE YOUR VILLAIN A FATAL FLAW THAT THE HERO MUST DISCOVER

Why are Voldemort's horcruxes so awesome? Because nobody knew they existed. Not even the readers, until the sixth book. Then we found out that three had already been destroyed, one of which we watched get destroyed and had no idea the significance until later.

GENIUS!!! Do that. Surprise the reader. Surprise the characters. Force them to discover the villain's weakness, or a way to fight him.

Everybody is different. Be creative! And if your antagonist is inside the hero's head, have him fight himself. Show us his torture and how he affects everything around him until he is able to reconcile with himself. Self-discovery and inner-conflicts make excellent storylines. Just be sure to wrap it up inside something else, and you're well on your way.


The villain of the story should fascinate us. Make readers fear, admire, or be shocked by him. Give readers a reason to care that the villain is hurting the hero. Give the readers a story why the villain is hurting the hero. People don't want the cheesy stuff. Show them that this guy could hurt them. Create that feeling and people will ask for the sequel.


Check out the follow-up post: How to Create a Magnificent Main Character

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Thursday, July 24, 2014

5 Query Letter Mistakes You Should Avoid

Writing your first query letter can be daunting. You have to pitch your book to an agent in 1-2 paragraphs (not including your hook line and bio) and you have to make it memorable.

In the near(ish) future, I'm going to write a post about the anatomy of a successful query letter with an in-depth analysis of my query (which has garnered a few partial and full requests, so yay!)


Without further ado...here we go.

Mistake #1: "MY BOOK IS DIFFERENT BECAUSE....!!!!!"

No, seriously. People have said that in their query letters. Not even joking. I used to fall victim to that, and now I've changed my methods because I learned that saying your book is different is you screaming I'M AN AMATEUR!!!

You need to know what your book is about. If somebody told you a chapter number, you should be able to tell them what happens in that chapter. As the author, it's your job to say, "this happened because this happened because this happened." Show that your story is connected to itself, or else it'll look like you write a bunch of events that don't seem connected.

But when it comes to the query, you have to explain one question: "What is the main character's conflict?" That's it. Nothing else. Hook the agent with the conflict.



Mistake #2: TRYING TO SQUEEZE IN EVERY OUNCE OF DETAIL THAT YOU CAN

Do yourself a favor and don't rewrite your book in the query letter. Save that for the synopsis. Leave stuff out. Lots of stuff. You have around 250-350 words to make the agent/publisher flip to the next page.

Remember, the only question you have to answer is, "What is the main character's conflict?"

In two paragraphs, introduce the character, introduce the situation, and show the agent that there will be a journey. Only include the main character and the character who has the largest influence on him/her throughout the story.

See, instead of stuffing the query full of shallow plot points, now you can expand on one or two points, giving the agent a chance to connect with the story and characters.



(Stupid) Mistake #3: "MY BOOK IS JUST LIKE THIS BEST-SELLING NOVEL OVER HERE!!!!!"

*cough* no it's not *cough*

I understand you spent the time to write a book and that's about as far as you'll get for a long time. Come on. I've been writing for 10 years and I'm not professionally published yet. You wanna know why? Because I wrote three books and, at the time, thought they were the best books in the whole wide world.

Today, I shudder at the thought of them.

When you write a book, I bet ten-to-one you think you have the next Harry Potter in your hands. You are so hopelessly in love with your book that of course everyone will love it! How couldn't they?

Basically, be humble.

Unlike this cat.

Mistake #4: "MY FRIENDS AND FAMILY ALL SAID----"

And to the trash it goes.


For some reason, I can't stop laughing at this.

Mistake #5: "MY HOBBIES INCLUDE WRITING AND READING."

Really? I wouldn't have guessed!

Yes, I have seen this in query letters....and....sadly I included these in the first query letter I ever wrote. But that was 7 years ago.


Personalize your hobbies and pastimes. Be specific. Make yourself look interesting. What do you do that nobody else does? Heck, what's a quirky thing you do?

As Haymitch Abernathy would say, "Give them something to root for." Show why you are unique. What makes you qualified to write this book? Why should they want you as a client?



As I mentioned above, I'll have a post analyzing my own query letter sometime in the near future. Subscribe and share to keep updated with my posts!

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Tuesday, July 22, 2014

A Broken Latch

Watch close there, at the door.
I think I should expect some mail,
Unless her hand has not yet traced
The words she wishes to share.

Waiting, waiting each day
For my letter to arrive.
Maybe it was lost,
Maybe the service ran astray.

Oh, how I tremble.
What folly! What shame!
Shall I ever know if she wrote
The letter that should be mine?

So I sit again and scribble,
Begging her to send another,
Praying she will accept my plea
To not be ignored.

Maps of EMBASSY

As I worked on EMBASSY (and now its sequel), I made a few maps to help organize the layout of cities in my head. I haven't made maps of cities on Belvun, but I might get around to those one day.

Remember to check out Embassy on Amazon!



Cornell, where Embassy opens.


The Undil Embassy


Orvad, seen in Book 2

Friday, July 18, 2014

Weird Al Yankovic's "Word Crimes"

This should be adopted as the Writer's Anthem. This music video is fantastic and displays nearly every complaint writers and grammar nazis have. Give it a watch!